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Medical malpractice: Hospice care concerns

Your family members may require hospice care as they reach the end of their lives. You may not expect that medical malpractice exists for hospice patients due to the sensitive nature of the type of care, and the fact that patients are terminally ill. However, this is not necessarily the case. Hospice nurses, like any other medical professional, may fail in giving the proper standard of care and cause unnecessary harm to you or your family member.

In-home health care providers often receive the contracts for hospice work. These providers still must follow standards and protocols that apply when a person is in a hospital or nursing home. Your family member has the right to safe, effective and humane treatment as a hospice patient. There are several types of medical malpractice claims that may apply to hospice care.

Your physician misdiagnosed your breast cancer. Should you sue?

A breast cancer diagnosis can truly be devastating to your quality of life. A delayed or misdiagnosed case of breast cancer can be even worse because you may suffer additional harm due to the lack of treatment. A delayed diagnosis can result in permanent injury or even death.

What constitutes medical malpractice due to negligence? Having this information can help you make informed choices about whether it is appropriate to pursue a medical malpractice lawsuit. Generally, in Ohio, there are four essential elements that you will need to demonstrate to prove your medical malpractice claim.

Malfunctioning Ride at the Ohio State Fair Leads to Multiple Injuries and Death

On Wednesday July 26, the first night of the 2017 Ohio State Fair, tragedy struck. While the "Fire Ball" carnival ride was operating on the evening of the 26th, the sudden and loud sound of cracking metal rang through the fairgrounds, and a large piece of the ride snapped loose and crashed to the ground, throwing riders through the air and onto the ground. One rider died upon hitting the ground, while at least seven others have suffered critical injuries.

A New Approach to Medical Malpractice

When someone is severely or fatally harmed due to medical errors the first concern should always be about the patient and their families. Unfortunately, that is rarely the case as many hospitals immediately engage in the "deny and defend" model. This approach just makes the experience that much more difficult for the victims of medical errors to find out what happened. In fact, most patients never learn that they have been injured due to a medical error. This is corroborated by a recent study that found that 77 percent of 300 primary-care doctors admitted they would not fully disclose to a patient when there had been a delayed breast cancer diagnosis.

Officials push to change federal rule limiting number of beds in addiction facilities

Like many states throughout the country, Ohio has been battling an opioid epidemic for several years and many victims of this epidemic are seeking treatment. With so many Ohioans seeking treatment, it is difficult for treatment facilities to make room for everyone who needs help. This is partly due to a 50-year-old federal rule that states community-based mental-health and addiction treatment centers can't receive Medicaid funding if their facility exceeds 16 beds. While it may not seem like a big deal to be put on a waitlist until a spot opens, this wait can be the difference between life and death for many of these addicts.

Misdiagnosis: When you pay the price for your doctor's oversight

Misdiagnosis. It shouldn't happen, but, unfortunately, it does, and on an alarmingly frequent basis. When it occurs, it's obviously a problem because before you can get the proper treatment you need, you need doctors to identify the illness you have. The issue goes beyond that, though. In America, approximately 12 million people receive incorrect diagnoses every year, and about 50 percent of the time, that incorrect diagnosis can result in serious harm.

Not only does a misdiagnosis delay recovery of the disease you do have, but it sometimes results in unnecessary treatments that can be dangerous, if not fatal. In fact, for the over 40,000 patients in intensive care units annually, that misdiagnosis may cost them not just their health but their lives. Incorrect diagnoses frequently mean costly surgeries and unnecessary painful procedures. Even when you're lucky enough to survive the misdiagnosis, the delay in receiving correct treatment can mean months of pain, if not years, or potentially even permanent disability.

State Pushes for Tighter Regulations on Nursing Homes

Governor John Kasich is pushing for tighter regulations on nursing homes in Ohio. This push comes as a result of inconsistent levels of quality care across Ohio's 929 nursing home facilities. Governor Kasich's plan to improve the quality of care in these facilities is designed to offer incentives to facilities that offer higher levels of care.

Some hospitals do not follow minimum standards to prevent errors

Many medical facilities are working hard to improve their standard of care. This includes instituting protocols for distributing medications, checklists before surgery and security measures to protect patient safety and privacy. Nevertheless, medical mistakes continue to be among the leading causes of death in the United States.

Over a decade ago, the National Quality Forum, a patient safety organization, listed 29 medical mistakes that should never happen, labeling them "never events." Since then, patient advocates have been trying to help hospitals and medical professionals to improve in their standard of care to avoid such incidents. If you suffered from a never event, you may wonder what to do next.

The importance of warning labels on prescription medications

Invokana belongs to a relatively new class of type 2 diabetes drugs called SGLT-2 inhibitors, which helps remove excess blood sugar through urine. The FDA just recently required Invokana to include a warning about a high risk of foot and leg amputations in diabetic patients. This change in the required warning is the result of two clinical trials that concluded that leg and foot amputations occurred about twice as often in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with Invokana, which puts a great many diabetic patients using Invokana at risk.

You probably don't consider this common surgical error

When you think of surgical errors, what comes to mind? Does this question conjure images of foreign objects left inside a patient, a surgeon operating on the wrong person or body part, or maybe a surgeon removing a healthy organ? If so, you aren't alone since most Ohio residents probably envision the same things.

However, many people miss one glaring and common surgical error: medication mistakes. When you're scheduled for a surgical procedure, you will more than likely receive medications before, during and after the procedure. That leaves a lot of room for error.

Our Recent Blog Posts

  • Aug 18 : Medical malpractice: Hospice care concerns
    Your family members may require hospice care as they reach the end of their lives. You may not expect that medical malpractice exists for hospice patients due to the sensitive nature of the type of care, and the fact that...
  • Aug 03 : Your physician misdiagnosed your breast cancer. Should you sue?
    A breast cancer diagnosis can truly be devastating to your quality of life. A delayed or misdiagnosed case of breast cancer can be even worse because you may suffer additional harm due to the lack of treatment. A delayed diagnosis...
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