Leeseberg & Valentine

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Genetic testing for breast cancer: When should it be done?

Angelina Jolie's dramatic decision in 2013 to have a preventative double mastectomy raised awareness around the world of the importance of genetic testing for cancer. She reached the decision after tests revealed the presence of a mutated gene that predisposed her to breast cancer.

Researchers responded by trying to understand the influence that Jolie's bold decision had on other women in getting tested for breast cancer, especially women with high hereditary risk. There was also research on whether having both breasts removed really is beneficial for women after a tumor is discovered in one.

The "Jolie effect" (as researchers call it) has made more women aware of genetic testing. But when should such testing be done? And are insurance companies dragging their feet in paying for it?

Not healing? Some postpartum complications are caused by malpractice

Thousands of concerns flash through an expecting mother's mind. While most of these fears dissipate at the sight of your new baby's face, the issue of mishandled tearing can become a lasting impact. It is common for most mothers to tear slightly when their baby is born, but some cases are more severe.

After months of stress and preparation all you will want to do is relax at home with your new baby. It will be a time to rest and let your body heal, but for some mothers the pain and complications will grow. Some issues can occur due to severe tears such as incontinence, infections, and fistulas.

Getting out of the war zone: Should seniors have a different type of ER?

It's a situation you never want to face: stuck in the ER, desperate for answers about what's happening to a person who is dear to you.

Far too often, the triage patients experience in these emergency department settings is brutal. The snap judgments are one-size-fits-all -- even when elderly people, with their complicated conditions, need a different type of screening.

Should hospitals create a different type of urgent-services setting for seniors? In this post, we will discuss the emerging trend toward geriatric emergency rooms.

New Technology Designed to Prevent Retained Surgical Sponges

Last April, we posted a blog entitled "What Steps Do Hospitals Take to Avoid Retained Surgical Items?" While this remains a necessary component of patient safety in the OR, new technologies have been released in recent years to further minimize this risk. These new technologies are an important step to help prevent these surgical "never events" from happening. These technologies include computer-assisted sponge count devices, radiofrequency detection systems, and radiofrequency identification systems.

Saying sorry for surgical errors: How often do doctors actually apologize?

Apologizing to someone for an error on your part that injured the other person is basic human decency.

Indeed, some psychologists believe that saying you're sorry is important even if you weren't at fault. It's a way of expressing empathy and showing you care about what the other person is going through.

To be sure, relationships between doctors and patients are professional, not personal. But national guidelines still call for surgeons and their hospitals to tell patients about any errors that occur during surgery - and to express regret that these errors occurred.

How often do surgeons and health care facilities actually do that? In this post, we will discuss that question.

Leeseberg & Valentine Settles Cases for $200K Against OSU Wexner Medical Center

Last month, attorney Craig Tuttle of Leeseberg & Valentine settled two cases on behalf of his clients against The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. The first case settled for $75,000 and the second case settled for $125,000. Both cases, while formally filed with the Court of Claims, were able to be resolved before commencing litigation. Craig commends OSU for its willingness to acknowledge something went wrong and proactive attitude in working to reach an agreement.

Postpartum care: make sure your concerns are addressed

Many stories are set in some long ago time in some land far away and feature some character or characters whose mother either died in childbirth or was somehow maimed and never the same.

But those are far-away stories, right? Well, not entirely. With today's modern medicine healthy babies and moms have become the rule - not the exception. But it is important to note exceptions do still happen.

As we will discuss in this post, injuries to the mother can interfere with what is supposed to be the joyous occasion of welcoming the new child.

Craig Tuttle Receives COAJ President's Award

Last month, the Central Ohio Association for Justice ("COAJ") suprised associate attorney Craig S. Tuttle with this year's President's Award. Each year at the annual Membership Luncheon, the COAJ selects one person to recieve this award in recognition of his outstanding professional service and generous committment to the association.

4 Things parents should know about birth injury lawsuits

When a child is born, doctors and medical staff should be able to predict potential problems before they happen and take steps to prevent life-altering birth injuries. However, injuries occur all too often, and parents don't necessarily recognize their own power to fight back until it is too late. A Huffington Post writer with cerebral palsy recently explained the impact his birth injury has had on his life. He also shared the following four points in hopes of giving parents a head start when considering legal action: 

Leeseberg & Valentine Secures Largest Settlement in History Against City of Columbus

The medical malpractice attorneys at Leeseberg & Valentine obtained a $1.2 million settlement against the City of Columbus for their client. This is the largest personal injury payout in city history and sets an important legal precedent that will hold public employees responsible for their egregious conduct. This settlement exceeds the prior record payment of $1 million, which was also obtained by Leeseberg & Valentine, in the case of Wagner v. City of Columbus, on behalf of a young boy electrocuted by a defective lamp post on one of the City's bridges.

In January 2011, Sonia Bray was undergoing imaging at an MRI facility when she vomited and began to feel distressed. An MRI facility employee called 911 and City of Columbus paramedics responded to the scene. Over the next ten minutes, two paramedics did little to nothing to help Ms. Bray. They eventually loaded her onto a cot, yet still provided essentially no care for another 15 minutes. Finally, 25 minutes after arriving on scene, the paramedics attempted to place Ms. Bray into the ambulance to transport her to the hospital. At that time, she suffered cardiopulmonary arrest. While she was resuscitated, she unfortunately suffered significant brain injury as a result of the arrest. She died two days later.

Our Recent Blog Posts

  • Sep 26 : Genetic testing for breast cancer: When should it be done?
    Angelina Jolie's dramatic decision in 2013 to have a preventative double mastectomy raised awareness around the world of the importance of genetic testing for cancer. She reached the decision after tests revealed the presence of a mutated gene that predisposed...
  • Sep 23 : Not healing? Some postpartum complications are caused by malpractice
    Thousands of concerns flash through an expecting mother's mind. While most of these fears dissipate at the sight of your new baby's face, the issue of mishandled tearing can become a lasting impact. It is common for most mothers to...
Read More Blog Posts

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